Anthology

The Second Science Fiction Megapack: 25 Modern and Classic Tales by Masters

The Second Science Fiction Megapack: 25 Modern and Classic Tales by Masters

Language: English

Pages: 481

ISBN: 2:00182731

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Retail ePub of this series which has seven 25-story packs (#3 has 26 for some reason) to this date released since 2011. Not released annually.

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Hours of great reading await, with tales from some of the 20th century's most renowned science fiction authors, Here are 25 science fiction stories:

WHAT’S HE DOING IN THERE? by Fritz Leiber

THE MARCHING MORONS, by C.M. Kornbluth

GHOST, by Darrell Schweitzer

DEATH WISH, by Robert Sheckley

THE WAVERIES, by Fredric Brown

ADAM AND NO EVE, by Alfred Bester

FOXY LADY, by Lawrence Watt-Evans

THIN EDGE, by Randall Garrett

COMPANDROID, by Nina Kiriki Hoffman

POSTMARK GANYMEDE, by Robert Silverberg

KEEP OUT, by Fredric Brown

THE HATE DISEASE, by Murray Leinster

UNIVERSAL DONOR, by Nina Kiriki Hoffman

THE GREEN BERET, by Tom Purdom

MR. SPACESHIP, by Philip K. Dick

BRKNK'S BOUNTY, by Jerry Sohl

THE BATTLE OF LITTLE BIG SCIENCE, by Pamela Rentz

THE EGO MACHINE, by Henry Kuttner

THE MAN FROM TIME, by Frank Belknap Long

THE SENSITIVE MAN, by Poul Anderson

REVOLUTION, by Mack Reynolds

THE THING IN THE ATTIC, by James Blish

KNOTWORK, by Nina Kiriki Hoffman

THE DUELING MACHINE, by Ben Bova and Myron R. Lewis

THE PLANET SAVERS, by Marion Zimmer Bradley

And don't forget to check out all the other volumes in the "Wildside Megapack" series! Search on "Wildside Megapack" in the ebook store to see the complete list...covering adventure stories, military, fantasy, ghost stories, and more!

A título de inventario

Adán y Eva / Tarumba / Diario semanario y poemas

The Complete Stories

The Mammoth Book of Steampunk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

in private—and let me give the orders.” One of the Darkovans gasped. I knew I could have been mobbed. But with a mixed bag of men, I had to grab leadership quick or be relegated to nowhere. I didn’t give Regis Hastur a chance to answer that, either; I said, “Come back here. I want to talk to you anyway.” He came, and I remembered to breathe. I led the way to a fairly deserted corner of the immense place, faced him and demanded, “As for you—what are you doing here? You’re not intending to cross

realized, I wouldn’t be there. I wouldn’t be anywhere. I was a surrogate, a substitute, a splinter of Jay Allison, and when it was over, Forth and his tactics would put me back into what they considered my rightful place—which was nowhere. I’d never climb a mountain except now, when we were racing against time and necessity. I set my mouth in an unaccustomed narrow line and said, “We’ll talk about that when we get back—if we ever do. Now I suggest we get going. Some of us would like to get down

Gas; that’s the coming thing. Every new home’s being piped for it, and plenty of the old ones. How about you?” “We got it. Luckily we had one of the old Linotypes that ran the metal pot off a gas burner, so it was already piped in. And our home is right over the office and print shop, so all we had to do was pipe it up a flight. Great stuff, gas. How’s New York?” “Fine, George. Down to its last million people, and stabilizing there. No crowding and plenty of room for everybody. The air—why,

nor died accidentally, and Tarnhorst had told him as much. Tarnhorst was still friendly, but he had taken the hint and got himself out of danger. There had been one very important piece of information. The denial that any representative of PMC 873 had been involved. PMC 873 was a manufacturer of biological products—one of the several corporations that Latrobe had been empowered to discuss business with when he had been sent to Earth by the Belt Corporations Council. Tarnhorst would not have

put down at this velocity.” * * * * The port filled up, as the globe swelled rapidly. The Pilot hurried toward the board, reaching for the controls. All at once the ship jerked. The nose lifted and the ship shot out into space, away from the moon, turning at an oblique angle. The men were thrown to the floor by the sudden change in course. They got to their feet again, speechless, staring at each other. The Pilot gazed down at the board. “It wasn’t me! I didn’t touch a thing. I didn’t even get

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