Children

Now We Are Six

Now We Are Six

A. A. Milne, Ernest Shepard

Language: English

Pages: 29

ISBN: B000JCZ4AA

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


When We Were Very Young and Now We Are Six complete the four-volume set of deluxe editions of the Milne and Shepard classic works. Like their companions, the Winnie-the-Pooh 80th Anniversary Edition and The House At Pooh Corner, these beautiful books feature a ribbon bookmark, a specially designed jacket with metallic ink and a peep-through window to the fullcolor case, and full-color artwork on cream-colored stock. The imaginative charm that has made Pooh the world’s most famous bear pervades the pages of Milne’s poetry, and Ernest H. Shepard’s witty and loving illustrations enhance these truly delightful gift editions.

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quote brief passages in connection with a review written for inclusion in a magazine, newspaper, or broadcast. The publisher does not have any control over and does not assume any responsibility for author or third-party websites or their content. CIP DATA AVAILABLE. Published in the United States by Dutton Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group 345 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014 www.penguin.com/youngreaders ISBN: 1-101-15896-4 to ANNE DARLINGTON

crisper, This odd little rhyme to the sky: Eight eights are eighty-one; Multiply by seven. If it’s more, Carry four, And take away eleven. Nine nines are sixty-four; Multiply by three. When it’s done, Carry one, And then it’s time for tea. Knight-in-Armour Whenever I’m a shining Knight, I buckle on my armour tight; And then I look about for things, Like Rushings-Out, and Rescuings, And Savings from the Dragon’s Lair, And fighting all the Dragons there. And sometimes

stiff-set Chancellor, But ran to the wicket-gate To see who was knocking. He found no rich man Trading from Araby; He found no captain, Blue-eyed, weather-tanned; He found no waiting-maid Sent by her mistress; But only a beggarman With one red stocking. Good King Hilary Looked at the beggarman, And laughed him three times three; And he turned that beggarman round about: “Your thews are strong, and your arm is stout; Come, throw me a Lord High Chancellor out, And take his

er-h’r’m of the book, and I have put it in, partly so as not to take you by surprise, and partly because I can’t do without it now. There are some very clever writers who say that it is quite easy not to have an er-h’r’m but I don’t agree with them. I think it is much easier not to have all the rest of the book. What I want to explain in the Introduction is this. We have been nearly three years writing this book. We began it when we were very young…and now we are six. So, of course, bits of it

er-h’r’m of the book, and I have put it in, partly so as not to take you by surprise, and partly because I can’t do without it now. There are some very clever writers who say that it is quite easy not to have an er-h’r’m but I don’t agree with them. I think it is much easier not to have all the rest of the book. What I want to explain in the Introduction is this. We have been nearly three years writing this book. We began it when we were very young…and now we are six. So, of course, bits of it

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