Capitalism

Anti-Capitalism: A Beginner's Guide (Beginner's Guides)

Anti-Capitalism: A Beginner's Guide (Beginner's Guides)

Language: English

Pages: 192

ISBN: 1780742509

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The puncture of the great banking bubble and the dash to austerity has breathed new life into protest movements across the globe and brought anti-capitalist values to the forefront as never before. But what does it mean to be anti-capitalist? And where is anti-capitalism going — if anywhere? Global civil society expert Simon Tormey explores these questions, and more, in this thought-provoking book.

Unlike other, ideologically-narrow introductions, Tormey introduces us to all the eclectic groups — anarchists, Marxists, autonomists, environmentalists — and thought that make up the anti-capitalist movement. Providing global and historical context, he takes us from the 1994 Zapatista insurrection through the 1999 Seattle protests right up to Occupy Wall Street, the Indignados of Spain and the current Greek uprisings. Going beyond a mere descriptive take, Tormey weighs up a range of possibilities for bringing about alternatives to the corporate domination of our planet. This is a fascinating and bold exploration of how to understand the world — and how to change it.

The Passions and the Interests: Political Arguments for Capitalism before Its Triumph (Princeton Classics)

Pretend We're Dead: Capitalist Monsters in American Pop Culture

Reification: or the Anxiety of Late Capitalism

The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold us Well-Being

Realizing Hope: Life Beyond Capitalism (2nd Edition)

Living in the End Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean-François Lyotard. Protesting against the iniquities of university funding (in particular the closing of the Nanterre campus), the protests quickly radicalised and generalised into an outright rejection of the French political and cultural establishment, and even more generally into a rejection of the materialist values and way of life that seemed to have stultified French life. All around Paris the now familiar slogans and images of outright rebellion could be seen: ‘Be Realistic: Demand the

can be made more caring and more responsible both to consumer and producer needs. • the primary function of international institutions is to regulate international affairs in accordance with what is just and reasonable as opposed to what is in the interests of corporations or big business. The UN is not an arm of capital, but an independent court of appeal and lobbying organisation which, with some reforms, could be an effective weapon in the struggle against the abuse of the world’s poor and

infrastructure needs. A constant in all anarchist approaches is, nonetheless, that any such matters can be dealt with without the need for the state, for armed intervention or the threat of it. We can and do co-operate with each other; the problem is that capitalism prevents us from doing so more extensively than at present. Means and ends Some or all such approaches can be regarded as more or less in keeping with those of many varieties of Marxism, particularly the more autonomist kinds. It is

space, territory or resources threatened by the encroachment of neoliberalism could be tied together for solidarity and support. We’ve already discussed the case of the Zapatistas; and there are many other significant autonomous resistances such as the Narmada Dam protests, the Piqueteros movement in Argentina, and quasi-permanent peasant and indigenous rebellions in areas such as West Bengal, various parts of China, West Papua and South Africa, to mention but a few. Together these initiatives

they do. Perhaps there will come a moment when this new generation of activists get fed up with their resonant, ‘instant’, immediate, oppositional politics. But the signs point in the opposite direction: towards greater speed, velocity, immediacy, vibrancy, and ‘spontaneity’. Secondly, and as would seem to follow from the above, the linear model of oppositional politics – which insists on building a party, mobilising people behind a manifesto or a program, and seeking power either through the

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